Chad Johnson Orthodontics Accessibility Statement

Chad Johnson Orthodontics is committed to facilitating the accessibility and usability of its website, chadjohnsonortho.com, for everyone. Chad Johnson Orthodontics aims to comply with all applicable standards, including the World Wide Web Consortium’s Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.0 up to Level AA (WCAG 2.0 AA). Chad Johnson Orthodontics is proud of the efforts that we have completed and that are in-progress to ensure that our website is accessible to everyone.

If you experience any difficulty in accessing any part of this website, please feel free to call us at 704-454-5500 or 704-688-0070 or email us at communications@chadjohnsonortho.com and we will work with you to provide the information or service you seek through an alternate communication method that is accessible for you consistent with applicable law (for example, through telephone support).

Orthodontist in Cornelius NC

Let's Talk!

At Chad Johnson Orthodontics, your smile is our passion. Our orthodontists provide you with the best care possible in Cornelius, all from a stress-free, comfortable setting. We know how much of a difference a beautiful smile can make, which is why we are so passionate about giving our clients a smile they love forever.

Having served metro Cornelius for years, we know that no two patients have the same orthodontic needs. That's why we offer a variety of treatment options to correct each patient's unique concerns, along with payment plans that make braces affordable for every family. You can rest easy knowing that our team specializes in the latest innovations in the field of orthodontics. This allows us to treat our patients in the most efficient, affordable, and aesthetically pleasing ways possible.

A few of our orthodontic treatment options in Cornelius include:

  • Invisalign®
  • Invisalign® Teen
  • Clear Braces
  • Traditional Braces
  • Early Treatment
  • Adult Treatment

If you're looking for an orthodontist in Cornelius, NC, who is professional, trustworthy, and compassionate, look no further than Chad Johnson Orthodontics. Your pathway to a beautiful smile starts by choosing the treatment options best for your lifestyle.

Brace Yourself for an Amazing Smile with Chad Johnson Orthodontics

Our orthodontic practice in Cornelius does things a little differently than others. Our doctors want to get to know you, your family, and your oral health goals. With more than 30 years of combined experience, we know that each smile our doctors help create is as unique as the person it belongs to.

That's why our practice offers several orthodontic solutions customized to your individual orthodontic needs. If you're a new patient, we know you probably have important questions that need answers. That's why new patients always receive a complimentary orthodontic consultation, so you can learn about the best treatment options for your budget and lifestyle.

At the end of the day, our goal is to make access to orthodontic treatment as available, effective, and easy as possible. Come experience why so many children, teens, and adults trust Chad Johnson Orthodontics with their oral health needs. We'd love to get to know you and your smile better today!

Orthodontist-phone-number 704-454-5500

Free Consultation

Latest News in Cornelius, NC

Who is Susan Johnson, 2023 candidate survey for Cornelius Board of Commissioners?

Name: Susan JohnsonAge as of Nov. 7, 2023: 49Campaign website or social media page: facebook.com/electsusanjohnson1Occupation: RealtorEducation: B.A., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; M.A., Queens UniversityHave you run for elected office before? (Please list previous offices sought or held)NoPlease list your highlights of civic involvement ...

Name: Susan Johnson

Age as of Nov. 7, 2023: 49

Campaign website or social media page: facebook.com/electsusanjohnson1

Occupation: Realtor

Education: B.A., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; M.A., Queens University

Have you run for elected office before? (Please list previous offices sought or held)

No

Please list your highlights of civic involvement

Current Chair, Cornelius Planning Board

What are, in your view, the most important issues facing Cornelius, and what would your approach be to handling them if elected?

The most important issues are traffic, public safety and improving affordability for workforce housing. I am passionate about listening to residents and making decisions so that Cornelius is a place where people want to live, work and play. As Cornelius has grown, so has traffic, which has created congestion related issues that impact citizen safety and overall quality of life. I plan to identify solutions for needed infrastructure projects that will mitigate congestion, enhance safety and improve walkability. Additionally, I want to move forward the existing projects that have already been approved and to create a strategic plan to implement balanced solutions that support smart, responsible growth to attract new businesses that will enhance overall quality of life and still maintain the small town feel.

Communities across Mecklenburg County have seen growth and development as well as a hot real estate market in recent years. How should Cornelius approach development and housing issues?

Currently there are a number of projects that were previously approved, and only one of which has actually started construction. These projects equate to over 1400 residences in which, In my opinion, our already congested roads can’t support. Cornelius needs to focus on implementing infrastructure projects and improvements now to allow for these and future housing projects.

What separates you from your opponent(s)?

My local government experience sets me apart from other candidates. I have served Cornelius over the past 10 years on many committees and boards including Planning Board, Land Development Code Advisory Board, Growth Management Task Force, Mayoral Housing Committee and Pre-Development Committee. Understanding the nuances and intricacies of local government will allow me make decisions more quickly and effectively once elected.

What one professional or political accomplishment are you most proud of?

I am proud to have been appointed to serve on the Growth Management Task Force. As a member, I was able to utilize my town government experience along with my real estate experience to make changes to the Land Use Plan. In addition, I am proud of the efforts that we made to ensure citizen engagement was prioritized and citizen input was considered when decisions were made for all of the proposed updates.

This story was originally published October 9, 2023, 6:00 AM.

Mary Ramsey is the local government accountability reporter for The Charlotte Observer. A native of the Carolinas, she studied journalism at the University of South Carolina and has also worked in Phoenix, Arizona and Louisville, Kentucky.

Cornelius may soon be home to a new pickleball facility

CORNELIUS, N.C. — Pickleball is one of the most popular sports in the country right now. As the sport continues to grow in popularity, more areas are looking to add courts, including Cornelius.Developers in Cornelius are seeking to build a facility called, "The Serve Pickleball Club." The Pre-Development Review Committee listened to a pitch on the possible pickleball facility coming to town.Attorney Larry Shaheen, who represented the development proposal, said Cornelius is the perfect fit for this kind of facili...

CORNELIUS, N.C. — Pickleball is one of the most popular sports in the country right now. As the sport continues to grow in popularity, more areas are looking to add courts, including Cornelius.

Developers in Cornelius are seeking to build a facility called, "The Serve Pickleball Club." The Pre-Development Review Committee listened to a pitch on the possible pickleball facility coming to town.

Attorney Larry Shaheen, who represented the development proposal, said Cornelius is the perfect fit for this kind of facility.

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“There is an absolute desire to see more facilities and then the applicants, Jack and Robin Salzman, wanted to fill that need and also be able to continue to do their work in the community," Shaheen said.

While pickleball is popular and enjoyed by people of all ages and skills, some people in communities near the proposed development are concerned about the noise.

“Most of the homes are anywhere between 507 and 100 feet away, so we don't anticipate there being a noise issue," Shaheen said. "But that is something we're continuing to do, the work you're working on is something we're gonna continue to focus on and make sure that there's gonna be zero impact too.”

RELATED: Giving Machines return to Charlotte for holiday season

The proposed project will include a 51,000-square-foot pickleball club and restaurant located on Chartown Drive. A lot of the space is designed to benefit the area. One of the most important goals of developers give back to the town.

Shaheen said the developers want to "provide a fantastic asset for the town of Cornelius that they can be proud of and that folks will be able to use throughout their time here in the town."

One business already benefitting from the popular sport is Rally, in Charlotte. Barrett Worthington is one of the co-founders of the Rally.

“The biggest sort of rewarding aspect of it for us has been seeing the retention and the return of the regular guests that are coming day after day," Worthington said.

Rally has been going strong in Charlotte since it opened in July 2023. Rally has filled 85% of their classes and welcomed 30,000 players on the courts and 40,000 people in the dining areas.

Both businesses have the main goal of continuing to serve the community by providing access to the popular sport.

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“It's not just providing a place to play, but a place that that you really can find your people and you know, have something of value," Worthington said.

Developers for The Serve Pickleball Club are applying for conditional rezoning with hopes of moving into the process for public community hearings.

Kayakers love this tiny North Carolina lake. You’ll see more wildlife than people.

Wyatt Maxey and friends at his Cornelius apartment complex love kayaking on a hidden-in-plain-sight waterway that locals call Lake Cornelius — one of North Carolina’s tiniest lakes.On any given day, truckers on nearby Inte...

Wyatt Maxey and friends at his Cornelius apartment complex love kayaking on a hidden-in-plain-sight waterway that locals call Lake Cornelius — one of North Carolina’s tiniest lakes.

On any given day, truckers on nearby Interstate 77 honk-honk friendly hellos.

Drivers in stopped traffic roll down their windows and ask, “Can I have a ride?”

Maxey instantly fell in love with the 125-acre Lake Cornelius when he moved to an apartment complex along its shores, off I-77, Exit 28.

The 27-year-old Charlotte native invited this Charlotte Observer reporter to kayak the lake after reading my Aug. 2 article about neighboring 341-acre Lake Davidson.

“Is Lake Davidson part of Lake Norman?” the headline asked. “Contrasts abound.”

The same question could be posed for Lake Cornelius, I quickly concluded after launching onto the lake, with Maxey and his friends who live there too, on a bright, 95-degree Sunday earlier in August. A slight breeze cooled us.

First, I was astounded to meet someone in their 20s who considers this nationally award-winning hometown newspaper an essential daily read. We hire only the best, I said.

Second, he’s a native Charlottean, just like my brother Jimmy, who was born at the old Mercy Hospital way back in 1955, making my brother older than these lakes!

“You’re as rare as that bald eagle I saw above Lake Davidson,” I told Maxey.

But back to the story.

Like Lake Davidson, Lake Cornelius is separated from massive Lake Norman by Interstate 77.

Maxey has kayaked through the tunnel-like culvert that connects Lake Cornelius with boat-packed Lake Norman and then through a separate tunnel to Lake Davidson, a roughly 2-mile trip.

Duke Energy says Lake Davidson and Lake Cornelius are part of Lake Norman, which at 32,475 acres is the state’s the largest human-made lake.

Under federal license, the company manages the lakes it formed along the Catawba River last century. So Duke Energy, more than anyone, should know if the smaller lakes are sections of the larger one.

Still ...

Lake Norman seemed a world apart when I kayaked the calm waters of Lake Davidson and Lake Cornelius this month.

I saw more wildlife than humans on each of the smaller lakes and only a couple of motor boats.

And that’s what Maxey and friends admire about their little lake, too.

“I love the quietness,” Macey Hess, a 24-year-old registered nurse at Lake Norman Regional Medical Center in Mooresville, told me on Lake Cornelius that Sunday. “It’s calm. I just like to be with our little group here.”

Lake Cornelius has no public boat launch, only a town of Davidson kayak launch located on the Davidson part of the lake, Maxey said. The lake is about half in Cornelius and half in Davidson, he said.

Hess’ boyfriend, 23-year-old Jonathan Nagle, highlighted the wildlife on Lake Cornelius.

“Anything from deer on the (unpaved) trail” that rings Lake Cornelius for 1 1/2 miles, “to owls, to osprey diving down into the water picking up fish,” said Nagle, who works for custom home builder CBUSA.

Plus turtles and herons, he said.

Nagle and Hess moved from her hometown of Harrisonburg, Virginia,— exactly a four-hour drive from Lake Norman — after Nagle visited here on a job assignment.

“There’s a lot of great wildlife out here,” Nagle said after the group hooked their kayaks to a floating dock they installed on the lake. “And a lot of fish, for humans and for birds.”

“The herons will stand on the shore as stealthy as can be until they see something in the water” to lunge for and devour, said Patrick Rallings, a 29-year-old software engineer at Ally Financial in uptown Charlotte.

Rallings joined us with his girlfriend, Emily Naviganuparp.

And a beaver has flapped its tail swimming past their dock to its home in another part of Lake Cornelius.

The animal inspired the name of their dock: “Beaver Island,” Maxey said.

“We like to sit out here on the lake, drink beer and watch people stuck in traffic,” Rallings quipped at the dock.

Said Nagle: “I’m glad that we’re cut off by 77, because we couldn’t do this right here if there were boats. And everyone could just come over here (from Lake Norman). It would just be part of the bigger lake.”

Maxey said he’s also enjoyed learning the history of his lake, including through chats with longtime homeowners.

Two bridges and a couple of road beds lie at the bottom of Lake Cornelius, his research revealed.

The kayakers met for the first time while standing outside their complex after an apartment fire in May.

They all kayaked, they discovered.

And Rallings and Maxey learned they worked for the same company. Maxey is a data engineer at Ally Financial.

Maxey graduated from Providence High School in 2014 and North Carolina State University in 2018. He ran cross country for N.C. State.

Like most who live in the Lake Norman area, he wondered when he moved here whether Lake Cornelius was its own lake or part of Lake Norman.

Lake Cornelius sure seemed different than Lake Norman, he said. And it connected with Lake Norman only through the culvert beneath I-77.

“How do you get a boat from side to side? Because I just assumed (this section) was an arm of Lake Norman,” Maxey said. “But you notice there’s no bridge to drive over it. I just never quite understood.”

“Before 77, it was Lake Norman. But now?” he said.

Water in the culvert flows from Lake Cornelius to Lake Norman, not vice-versa, he observed.

Still, his apartment complex, while on Lake Cornelius, is named Bexley Lake Norman.

Live Life by the Lake,” Bexley Lake Norman touts on its website. “Luxury Apartments on Lake Norman in Cornelius NC.”

So Maxey was curious what I thought: Is Lake Cornelius really Lake Norman, or not?

I’ve wondered the same thing since moving to the Lake Norman area in 1989 — actually, well to the west for my first seven years here in Lincolnton.

I figured a quick Google search would settle the issue before this month’s expedition, but no.

Only one of the first nine sites that surfaced when I plugged “Lake Cornelius” into my search acknowledged its existence.

And that was in a headline of part of a Duke Energy federal re-licensing document.

The other sites ignored Lake Cornelius, mentioning Lake Norman instead.

As we kayaked silent Lake Cornelius and then relaxed on Beaver Island, I blurted out my opinion on whether the lake was Lake Norman.

By then, I had temporarily blinded myself when I scratched an itch on an eyelid and inadvertently smeared sunscreen lotion onto my eyes. It stung big-time for several hours, but I tried to remain coherent.

“I think it’s its own lake, but I think it’s whatever you want it to be,” I told the gang, prompting chuckles. “That’s what I concluded with Lake Davidson, but even more so with this.”

I was about to elaborate when I spotted something rare on Lake Cornelius despite my burning eyes.

“Look,” I said. “A boat!”

This story was originally published August 22, 2023, 6:00 AM.

704-358-5067

Joe Marusak has been a reporter for The Charlotte Observer since 1989 covering the people, municipalities and major news events of the region, and was a news bureau editor for the paper. He currently reports on breaking news.

Who is Denis Bilodeau, 2023 candidate for Cornelius mayor?

Name: Denis BilodeauAge as of Nov. 7, 2023: 69Campaign website or social media page: bilodeauformayor.comOccupation: Retired Insurance ExecutiveEducation: BS- Business Management University of ConnecticutHave you run for elected office before? (Please list previous offices sought or held)2017 -2019 Commissioner...

Name: Denis Bilodeau

Age as of Nov. 7, 2023: 69

Campaign website or social media page: bilodeauformayor.com

Occupation: Retired Insurance Executive

Education: BS- Business Management University of Connecticut

Have you run for elected office before? (Please list previous offices sought or held)

2017 -2019 Commissioner, Town of Cornelius; 2019 -2021 Mayor Pro Tem, Town of Cornelius; 2021 -2023 Commissioner, Town of Cornelius

Please list your highlights of civic involvement

Founding Board Member - Cain Center for the Arts; Past President - Rotary Club Of North Mecklenburg; Past President- Peninsula Property Owners Association; Board Member - Kings Point Village Association and Bayshore Condo Owners Association; Two-term Cornelius Park Commissioner; Former Board Member Visit Lake Norman and LKN Chamber; Former Board Member Arts and Science Council

What are, in your view, the most important issues facing Cornelius, and what would your approach be to handling them if elected?

Traffic congestion has consistently been identified by citizens as the biggest drain on the quality of life in Cornelius. Safety is also very important in our town and on the lake. Although there are several NCDOT approved projects scheduled for our roads, we should not wait for NCDOT to move forward on Town managed and paid for improvements. As mayor, I will set an agenda with focus and urgency to address traffic congestion, bike lane and pedestrian cross walk safety. I will advocate for using some of our surplus funds to address these needs and others within our town’s capability.

Communities across Mecklenburg County have seen growth and development as well as a hot real estate market in recent years. How should Cornelius approach development and housing issues?

The town’s new Land Use Plan emphasizes commercial over residential development in order to better balance our property tax mix. There are several approved projects which have not yet come out of the ground. We should take this time to address infrastructure and road needs.

What separates you from your opponent(s)?

I have great respect for the office of mayor. There are however, significant areas of difference on the “business side” of the mayor’s responsibility that came to light during this past budget review.. After six straight years of budget surplus, I advocated for a “revenue neutral” tax change .I believe it was especially important to hold the line this year in view of the property revaluation increase and the county’s tax hike. The mayor argued for a double digit / two penny tax increase. I will continue to take a fiscally conservative approach and respect the value of our taxpayer’s hard earned money. A second issue is setting an agenda that lacks urgency. A recent example is the establishment of a six month Transportation Task Force to advise the town’s Transportation Advisory Board, which advises the Town Board. The stated delivery date for the Task Force is December 2023,. Unfortunately, a decision must be made by end of October 2023 to meet NCDOT deadlines for discretionary funds. I understand that activity does not equal action. As mayor, I will set an agenda that responds with urgency.

What one professional or political accomplishment are you most proud of?

As a town commissioner, I have been involved with many decisions that served to improve the quality of life in Cornelius. I am especially proud of a recent budget amendment I advocated for and introduced to add a School Resource Officer for both of our elementary schools. Protecting our children is a high priority and passion for me.

This story was originally published October 9, 2023, 6:00 AM.

Mills Market moving forward: Cornelius town board to discuss rezoning for new commercial development

More VideosCORNELIUS, N.C. — A brand new development could be coming to Catawba Ave. in Cornelius.Mills Market would bring 12,000-square-feet of ground floor commercial space and more than 200 multi-family apartments downtown. Highline Partners is the developer ...

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CORNELIUS, N.C. — A brand new development could be coming to Catawba Ave. in Cornelius.

Mills Market would bring 12,000-square-feet of ground floor commercial space and more than 200 multi-family apartments downtown. Highline Partners is the developer spearheading the project.

"It provides more restaurants, food and beverage establishments that people can enjoy," Highline's Mark Miller said at a planning board meeting last month.

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The Cornelius town board is holding a public hearing Monday night at 6 p.m. to talk rezoning and development agreement requests. The proposed agreement is a partnership with the town of Cornelius to construct a minimum of 130 public parking stalls and “the conveyance of access, utility and solid waste receptacle easements”.

Some people in Cornelius are excited about what Mills Market will bring, but others are apprehensive about the traffic impacts and losing the “small town" feel.

RELATED: Cornelius planning board approves downtown 'Mills Market'

The town board and Highline Partners say they’re taking these things into consideration before breaking ground.

Contact Destiny Richards at drichards5@wcnc.com and follow her on Facebook, X and Instagram.

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